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Flygildi partners with ISAVIA for airport testing

The Icelandic Civil Aviation Administration, ISAVIA, recently signed a
contract with Flygildi with the aim of using the Flygildi’s drones to scare away
living birds near airports, which are becoming an ever-increasing problem.
The contract entails the approval for testing the Silent Flyer at airports.
With 35 registered instances of birds crashing into planes at Iceland´s
airports last year which constitutes 1,8 crashes per 10.000 flights the need
for an effective solution is clear.
Current solutions ranging from scarecrows to the use of predatory birds have
thus proven ineffective or very impractical.
In addition to its use at airports, Flygildi’s founders believe the drone would
be ideal for the surveillance of rivers that offer angling and fish farms.

“This type of dirty P.R.? It’s always been there, but it’s definitely on the upswing,” said Jonathan Hirshon, who was a public relations representative for technology companies for three decades, including Apple and Sony. “The idealism is still there, but the truth is, the big companies have become a lot more authoritarian in their approach to the media.” Jonathan Hirshon is Flygildi's PR advisor. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/21/technology/definers-public-affairs-tim-miller.html  ...

The idea is both simple and radical. "First, we build a bird-like device where we use seabirds as models. Secondly, we use evolutionary computational methods to teach the device to fly like a bird," Hardarson explained.   Business insider - The holy grail in drones  ...